Here at Grid & Pixel, we’re always looking for ways to help our users. We found this article on Kinsta that covers a very common issue for a lot of our users. You can read it in it’s entirety here.

What is the Your Connection is Not Private Error?

The “your connection is not private” error only pertains to sites that are running over HTTPS (or should be running over HTTPS). When you visit a website, your browser sends a request to the server where the site is hosted. The browser then has to validate the certificate installed on the site to ensure it is up to current privacy standards. Other things that also take place include the TLS handshake, the certificate being checked against the certificate authority, and decryption of the certificate.

If the browser finds that the certificate isn’t valid, it will automatically try to prevent you from reaching the site. This feature is built into web browsers to protect the user. If the certificate isn’t set up correctly, this means data can’t be encrypted properly and therefore the site is unsafe to visit (especially those with logins or that process payment information). Instead of loading the site, it will deliver an error message, such as “your connection is not private.”

Your Connection is Not Private Error Variations

There are a quite a few different variations of this error depending upon which web browser you’re using, operating system, and even the configuration of the certificate on the servers. And while some of these errors sometimes mean slightly different things, a lot of times the troubleshooting steps are the same.

Google Chrome

In Google Chrome if there is an issue validating the certificate the error will show as “your connection is not private” (as seen below).

Attackers might be trying to steal your information from domain.com (for example, passwords, messages, or credit cards).

Your connection is not private error in Chrome

Your connection is not private error in Chrome

This is also accompanied by an error code message which helps to try and pinpoint the exact issue. Below are just a couple of the most common error codes you might see in Google Chrome:

  • ERR_CERT_SYMANTEC_LEGACY
  • NET::ERR_CERT_AUTHORITY_INVALID
  • ERR_CERT_COMMON_NAME_INVALID
  • NET::ERR_CERT_WEAK_SIGNATURE_ALGORITHM
  • ERR_CERTIFICATE_TRANSPARENCY_REQUIRED
  • NET::ERR_CERT_DATE_INVALID
  • SSL certificate error
  • ERR_SSL_VERSION_OR_CIPHER_MISMATCH

Mozilla Firefox

In Mozilla Firefox the error message varies slightly, and instead of “your connection is not private” you’ll see “your connection is not secure” (as seen below).

The owner of domain.com has configured their website improperly. To protect your information from being stolen, Firefox has not connected to this website.

Your connection is not secure warning in Firefox

Your connection is not secure warning in Firefox (Image source: Firefox Help)

Just like in Chrome, it’s accompanied by an error code message which helps to try and pinpoint the problem. Below are just a couple of the most common error codes you might see in Mozilla Firefox:

  • MOZILLA_PKIX_ERROR_ADDITIONAL_POLICY_CONSTRAINT_FAILED
  • SEC_ERROR_EXPIRED_ISSUER_CERTIFICATE
  • SEC_ERROR_EXPIRED_CERTIFICATE
  • SEC_ERROR_UNKNOWN_ISSUER
  • MOZILLA_PKIX_ERROR_MITM_DETECTED
  • ERROR_SELF_SIGNED_CERT
  • SSL_ERROR_BAD_CERT_DOMAIN

Microsoft Edge

In Microsoft Edge, you will also see the error as “your connection is not secure.”

This might mean that someone’s trying to fool you or steal any info you send to the server. You should close this site immediately.

These are also accompanied by an error code message. Below are just a couple of the most common error codes:

  • Error Code: 0
  • DLG_FLAGS_INVALID_CA
  • DLG_FLAGS_SEC_CERT_CN_INVALID

Read the rest of this article on Kinsta.